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Research Themes

UCRISE research is multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary in nature as it combines experts in all facets of sport including physiology, psychology, biomechanics, strength and conditioning, coaching science, performance analysis, performance nutrition and dietetics, physiotherapy, industrial design, data and mathematical modelling and statistics, graphic and visual design, computer engineering as well as sport management, ethics, law and governance.

High Performance Sport and Exercise

RISE is committed to advancing standards, practices and knowledge in high performance sport. RISE researchers undertake projects which combine University of Canberra expertise in sports science, sports medicine, physical literacy, and management, with that of industry partners. Our research efforts encompass the domains of sporting competition, athlete training and our world-class facilities at RISE.

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Sport and Exercise Medicine

Members of the Sport and Exercise Medicine research group work closely with staff involved in injury prevention and athlete availability programs across Australia’s National Sports Institute and Academies Network with RISE currently being the Australian sector lead in industry-partnership workplace embedded doctoral student programs.

Within the Sport and Exercise Medicine theme, the RISE Physical Literacy research program improves the physical literacy of all Australians through physical education, sport, and community linkages.

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Environmental Physiology

Environmental physiology research at RISE examines the mechanisms that mediate health and performance in adverse environments: primarily heat and altitude.

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Active Brain

The Active Brain theme at RISE investigates interrelationships between human movement and the brain, seeking to optimise health and performance.

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Exercise Epigenetics

The key activities of the Exercise Epigenetics research theme are underpinned by accumulating evidence that aging is linked to negative epigenetic alterations in cells.

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