Print this page

Donald Horne Creative and Cultural Fellows

The DHCCF provides funding to recent graduates of the doctoral program who were members of the CCCR at the University of Canberra. The fellowship is project-based and aims to assist the Fellow to produce a significant work or body of work related to their doctoral research in the period after the awarding of their degrees.

2020

2018

  • Dr Owen Bullock
  • Dr Caren Florance

2017

  • Dr Monica Carroll
  • Dr Paul Collis

2016

  • Dr Niloofar Fanaiyan
  • Dr Mona Soleymani

2015

  • Dr Patrick Mullins

2020 Donald Horne Creative & Cultural Fellows

Kirsten Krauth


Photo credit: Penny Ryan

Project title: Almost a Mirror

Almost a Mirror is a podcast about 80s song and music history to be streamed later in the year. The novel (and thesis) Almost a Mirror was produced at the University of Canberra under the supervision of Ross Gibson. It recently received the Parker Medal for Most Outstanding PhD thesis in 2019, the first time awarded to a creative writing thesis. The novel manuscript was also shortlisted for the Penguin Literary Prize and the book has recently been published by Transit Lounge. As the novel/thesis has been structured as a mixtape of 80s punk and pop songs, my idea is to work with a number of musicians including Peter Fenton, Michael Simic (aka Mikelangelo) and Richard Andrew on re-versioning 12 Australian songs, intermingled with my reading of the chapter, to create a new and innovative work. Each podcast episode will feature this work along with a narrative history of the song and its place in Australian 80s music culture. In researching my novel, many stories have emerged, tracing a strong sense of time and place – from the Crystal Ballroom to the Countdown studio – placing songs like 'Wide Open Road', 'Barbados', 'Change in Mood', 'Send Me an Angel', 'Nick the Stripper', 'Alone with You' (to name a few) in a new historical/cultural context.

Tim Napper

Project title: Howling Metal: the Shape of Trauma in Vietnamese Noir

Dr Tim Napper is a former diplomat and aid worker, having lived and worked throughout Southeast Asia for over a decade. Writing as T. R. Napper, he is now an award-winning short story writer. His project for the Donald Horne Creative & Cultural Fellowship is a science fiction noir novel, set in Vietnam and Australia, titled Howling Metal. The world has changed with the onset of Covid-19, and yet this creative work is well-placed. An ongoing concern of Napper's art – the rise of China, the surveillance state, climate change, staggering inequality, trauma, and pandemics – will only become more strikingly relevant as the events of 2020 play out.

Olga Walker

Project title: Writing through overcrowded places into hollowed out spaces: Life after bushfire fighting

The 2019/20 bushfire season started early and in October 2019, I also graduated with my PhD at the University of Canberra. Life at that time was filled with an array of activities including repainting feature walls, writing poetry, taking photos, weekly fire-fighter training and attending the smaller fires in our area. The bushfire season then descended on us at full pace and its end was abruptly followed by the Covid-19 virus.

Most of my fire-fighting/training activities with the Rural Fire Service (RFS) and other physical activities have temporarily ceased. Thus I am able now to devote time to my new research and creative writing project, Writing through overcrowded places into hollowed out spaces: Life after bushfire fighting. The project will use an auto-ethnographic approach to track how I balance what became my everyday firefighting experiences with life before and beyond the fire-ground.

The learnings of 2019/20 are intense but, for me, creative writing is that hollowed out space where I can breathe deeply. It has also become a place where I can feel good about being excited about ‘creative writing’. This project will be one expression of that excitement.