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Unknown: Cloissonee Vase

Unknown Cloissonnee Vase

The  Artwork

Two Japanese Cloisonnee Vases in aqua-blue with flower motif designs. These two vases are examples of modern mass produced versions and were believed to be created in the late 1970s. They are a great example of decorative art that use traditional methods. Cloisonne is an enamelling technique in which the pattern is formed by wires soldered to the surface of the object to be decorated, which is usually made from copper, forming cells or cloisons, each of which holds a single colour of enamel paste which is then fired, and ground and polished. The cloisonne technique has been in use since the 12th century BC in the west, but the technique did not reach China until the 13th or 14th century. It became popular in China in the 18th century. Initially bronze or brass bodies were used, and in the 19th century copper, at which time the quality of the items produced began to decline. Chinese cloisonné is the best known enamel cloisonné, though the Japanese produced large quantities from the mid-19th century, of very high technical quality. In the west the cloisonne technique was revived in the mid 19th century following imports from China, and its use continued in the Art Nouveau and Art Deco periods.

References

https://www.carters.com.au/index.cfm/index/4452-cloisonne-japanese-vases/