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Helen Nislev Inland Images

Helen Nislev Inland Images

Inland Images

Although little is known in terms of biography about Helen Nislev, we know that the artist was active in the mid to late 1970s. In an article from the Canberra Times, dated 12 August 1975 by Geoffrey Proud (an artist also represented in the Art Collection), Helen's works are critiqued.  Helen is known to paint 'surrealist tinged landscapes' using a style called 'frottage'.  This technique consists of taking a rubbing of a rough surface, such as bark or even floorboard and using it as a basis for drawing or painting The technique was first developed in the 1920s and produced a series of hallucinatory images superimposed upon one another.  Where Helen successes in this process is by setting up association between the viewer's recognising the fidelity of the landscape on the canvas to real landscape.  As the title suggests, Inland images works on the viewer's imagination of harsh dry, burnt landscapes frequented with dust-storms.

The work of art which looks much like a series of small post-card like images was created in 1978 and was articulated using oils onto Canvas.