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Aug 6 2021

IAE Seminar Series: From tena koutou to yaama; a collaborative journey in water science

The study of freshwater ecosystems, from some of the wettest places on Earth to some of the driest, has provided the opportunity to both reach deeply into ecological theory and to directly address the challenges of policy and management. As ecologists, freshwater habitats provide the opportunity to address fundamental questions in landscape ecology, disturbance and ecotoxicology. In the applied realm, management of water quality and quantity is THE fundamental global challenge of this millennium. Through a series of case studies, I will describe how the healthy tension between the fundamental and the applied has enriched my career as a water scientist. As global water issues become still more profound, there are new challenges to reach across disciplines and embed ecology into the science of social-ecological systems to generate sustainable solutions for humanity. Speaker details: Ross Thompson Is Professor and Foundation Director of the Centre for Applied Water Science at the University of Canberra. His research interests are biodiversity and restoration of landscapes, mainly in freshwater ecosystems. Ross is co-lead of the $8M basin-scale assessment of environmental watering in the Murray Darling Basin and has an active research program on aquatic biodiversity and ecosystem function in urban and rural landscapes. From 2016-2019 Ross sat on the Australian Research Council College of Experts and he is a past President of the Australian Freshwater Sciences Society. In 2021 Ross was awarded the Hilary Jolly Medal for Excellence in freshwater sciences, and his talk here is a practise for his medal address in October. 

11:30 - 12:30
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Aug 13 2021

IAE Seminar Series: Adapting water management to climate change in the Murray-Darling Basin

The Murray-Darling Basin has some of the most sophisticated water management in the world, which deals well with the very high variability of water availability from year to year. Some argue this will make water management adaptable to climate change while others argue the opposite on the basis of impacts of recent droughts. In this talk I will summarise the projections of future water availability in the Basin under climate change and how they compare to recent extreme droughts. This illustrates the conditions to which water management will need to adapt. I will then describe some of the limits of adaptability of current management practices and suggest some new approaches that could be taken, starting with the required review of the Basin Plan in 2026. Speaker details: Dr Prosser is an Adjunct Professor at the Centre for Applied Water Research, University of Canberra. He was previously manager of the Water Information Services Branch at the Bureau of Meteorology and Science Director for the CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship Program. He has 30 years’ experience in research and program leadership, leading national R&D programs in water resources, riparian management, and catchment water quality. He is lead author of the popular book, Water: Science and Solutions for Australia; won the CSIRO Chairman’s Medal as part of the Murray-Darling Basin Sustainable Yields project team; and is author of over 150 scientific publications. He recently assisted the Murray-Darling Basin Authority in designing their Water and Environmental Research Program from which some of the ideas presented in this seminar originated.

11:30 - 12:30
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Aug 20 2021

LinkedIn for Researchers and Research Managers

Learn how to get the most from the LinkedIn platform. Meet your presenter: Nick McNaughtonNick McNaughton is a highly experienced CEO who has been a successful entrepreneur, mentor, investor and fund manager. Nick started his career in the software industry where he specialised in bringing US vendors into the Asia / Pacific region. He spent extensive time living and working in Asia. He has been a successful angel investor for over two decades. Successes include Soulmates Technology, Zookoda, Vocus (ASX:VOC) & Windlab (ASX:WND).He is a veteran of the University IP commercialization field. He is the part-time CEO of ANU Connect Ventures a $37M seed investment fund (owned by the Australian National University and MTAA Super). He has reviewed and assessed a wide array of ideas, inventions and discoveries. The fund invested in several successful companies including Lithicon (Trade sale FEI), InterfereX (Trade sale – NYSE: Dolby), Instaclustr, Liquid Instruments and EpiAxis Therapeutics.He led the initiative by the Group of Eight & the University of Auckland to partner with the IP Group to open their Asia / Pacific office in A/NZ. He has also had extensive interactions with the applied technology Universities (UTS, Wollongong, Deakin and Macquarie). He is the Chairman of the Discovery Translation Fund evaluation committee (ANU, University of Canberra, CSU) and spent 18 months on the UTS Commercialisation Advisory Panel.

12:00 - 13:00
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Aug 27 2021

IAE Seminar Series: Effects of multiple pharmaceutical stressors on freshwater ecosystem process

The widespread occurrences of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) have been reported in the surface water all over the world. These occurrences raised a concern over their potential ecological effects on freshwater ecosystems. This research investigated the effects of selected (PhACs) on the rates of leaf litter decomposition which is an essential process in the freshwater ecosystems. The study investigated the PhACs effects on leaf litter decomposition rates (LLDRs) separately, in mixture, and combined with temperature as an environmental stressor. The study investigated the mediation of microbes and invertebrate shredders on the effect of PhACs on LLDRs.The study findings suggest that there is basis for concern about the biological effects of PhACs in the environment, and there is need for further investigation into the degradation processes and pharmacokinetics of PhACs in natural systems, in combination, and in interactions with other environmental factors.  Speaker details: Haysem Alhassen is PhD candidate at the University of Canberra and member of the Centre for Applied Water Science. His PhD research title is Effects of multiple pharmaceutical stressors on freshwater ecosystem process. Haysem holds bachelor’s degree in medical forensic and analytical chemistry from the University of Victoria. He also completed one year honours research in Environmental Science at the RMIT University. Currently he works full time as an academic advisor at a foreign diplomatic mission, looking after his wife and daughter, and preparing to submit his thesis soon. Today he is giving his final seminar talk.

11:30 - 12:30
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