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Coding Theory (6539.6)

Level: Undergraduate Third Year Level
Credit Points: 3
HECS Bands: 2
Faculty: Faculty of Science and Technology
Discipline: Academic Program Area - Technology

Availability

    Unit Outlines

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    • Semester 2, 2018, ON-CAMPUS, BRUCE (181696) - View
    • Semester 2, 2017, ON-CAMPUS, BRUCE (169998) - View
    • Semester 2, 2016, ON-CAMPUS, BRUCE (152030) - View
    • Semester 2, 2015, ON-CAMPUS, BRUCE (140851) - View

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    Syllabus

    Coding theory is the area of applied mathematics concerned with the efficient and accurate communication and storage of digital data. Sophisticated mathematical concepts such as finite fields have turned out to be exactly the right tools here. Applications range from mobile phones to deep space communications, computer networks to DVDs. This unit develops the mathematics needed and proceeds to its application in error detection and correction via linear, cyclic and/or convolutional codes. Examples such as Hamming, BCH and/or Reed-Solomon codes will be examined, along with their applications in various fields. This unit provides the students with the solid knowledge in the coding theory as well as in the coding theory applications. In addition, the unit promotes and strengthens important generic skills, such as communication, analysis and inquiry, problem solving, independent and group working, and professionalism and social responsibility.

    Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to;

    1. Understand and apply the techniques of error detection and correction, to prove the properties of the codes studied;

    2. Demonstrate the familiarity with issues arising from the applications of these coding;

    3. Apply their knowledge to invent new coding algorithms; and

    4. Will further strengthen important generic skills, such as communication, analysis and inquiry, problem solving, independent and group working, and professionalism and social responsibility.

    Assessment Items

    Contact Hours

    A 2-hour lecture and a 2-hour tutorial per week

    Prerequisites

    6543 Mathematical Structures OR 8110 Linear Algebra

    Corequisites

    None.

    Assumed Knowledge

    None.

    Incompatible Units

    None.

    Equivalent Units

    None.



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